Partition Walls as Good Fences

Really just a holding-post as a reminder I need to publish a definitive version of the Good Fences piece. It’s been compromised so many times by suggestions of tailoring it to current publishing opportunities, but the generality of it continues to emerge. This post today from Jon Haidt has given me the nudge: This is … Continue reading “Partition Walls as Good Fences”

Avoiding objective fetishisation of cultures. “On Fences and Fractures” @Kenanmalik @NIESRorg

Kenan Malik gave the Stephen Lissenberg Memorial Lecture at the NIESR in London last week (23rd Sept). The full transcript is here on his Pandaemonium web pages: “On Fences and Fractures – or what’s wrong with multiculturalism” so no need for a detailed summary here. His critique of multiculturalism is not new, but he was able … Continue reading “Avoiding objective fetishisation of cultures. “On Fences and Fractures” @Kenanmalik @NIESRorg”

Classifying an Unread Book

Mentioned just a couple of days ago another addition to Eco’s library of unread books (Mark Solms’ “The Hidden Spring“). Also picked-up today, because it was in stock at our local bookshop, Carlo Rovelli’s latest “Helgoland“. I expected it to be in stock, as it’s gone straight onto the Time’s bestseller list, otherwise I wasn’t … Continue reading “Classifying an Unread Book”

Everyday Story of Caring Colleagues

I mentioned Line of Duty once before, when reviewing Unforgotten, and I don’t intend to add to the screeds written about the low key final episode of series 6. It was low-key, but it was nevertheless genius. Brilliant by Jed Mercurio and the team. Fits my own story of what makes reality tick at several … Continue reading “Everyday Story of Caring Colleagues”

A remarkable book. It changes everything.

Busy, Busy, Busy. Mentioned strange times regarding work-load and productivity a few posts ago; my pipeline stuffed with unread bookmarks and unresolved references, and a to-do-list with at least seven dimensions of priorities to juggle, personally and professionally. Not exactly “treading water”, but difficult to discern progress going anywhere. Ironic that the immediately previous Wittgensteinian … Continue reading “A remarkable book. It changes everything.”

Identity and Logical Positivism

Convergence of every topic in every post is making it difficult to maintain coherence – understandability – in what I’m posting recently, and the main reason I need to take a step back and create a more coherent whole piece of writing. Individual posts either take too much for granted to be intelligible, or are … Continue reading “Identity and Logical Positivism”

Treading Water

Strange times – partly Covid-measures-related – but between professional engagements and buried in domestic projects for a few weeks, I have dozens of bookmarked pieces for thinking and writing. Many dozens. Just very briefly caught-up on two – “The CSI Effect” from Dave Trott and “Corpus Callosum Disrupted in Autism” from Jessica Wright. The latter … Continue reading “Treading Water”

Schlick and the Vienna Circle

As promised when I finished Misak’s wonderful biography of Frank Ramsey, I’m now reading David Edmonds “The Murder of Professor Schlick – The Rise and Fall of the Vienna Circle“. Most interesting chapter so far concerns the different factions of Jews and anti-semites in Vienna as we approach the 1930’s – and the consequences for … Continue reading “Schlick and the Vienna Circle”